Shady Nook Scotties

How To Choose Your Breeder

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Contact us at :  shadynook47@gmail.com or 812-858-3977.

Many people who contact us have said that they are unsure how to tell if a breeder is reliable and reputable.   It is difficult to know if the person you're talking to is who they say they are, and if they will do what they say they will do.   Here are 12 questions that should help you decide if the breeder is right for you.......

1. Are both parents on site?

This lets you see both parents and see how they behave. This is a good indicator of how your puppy will act.

2. Are the parents and puppies AKC registered?

If not, RUN!!! AKC has the strictest guidelines of any of the registries. Most dogs that are not AKC should never have been born because they can be of very poor quality.

3. Are the parents current on all shots and Heartworm preventative?

This shows that the parents are well cared for, and that the breeder cares about them.

4. Have all of the proper genetic tests been done on the parents before breeding?

This shows that the breeder cares about eliminating are any potential serious genetic defects in the lines.

5. What type of health guarantee does the puppy have?

Reputable breeders have a return or refund policy (IN WRITING)  if the puppy has genetic health issues.

6. What kind of contract must I sign to get the puppy?

If there is no contract, RUN! This shows that the breeder really cares enough to spell out the entire transaction in detail, so that all parties understand up front. Usually, the puppy purchase contract will also include the health guarantee.

7. Will the puppy have its first shots and be wormed?

This is a MUST! Puppies retain some protection from their mother, but need to be provided their own protection regimen, starting at 6 weeks of age. Though we can buy meds and give the shots ourselves, our vet gives ALL our puppy shots.

8. What is the communication with the breeder like ?

If the breeder doesn’t answer your calls within a reasonable time BEFORE you get your puppy, it won’t improve AFTER your puppy arrives. If you have a problem, you want to know that the breeder will return your call.

9. Does the breeder have a way that you can see their adults/puppies BEFORE you contact them (such as a website) ??

You should be able to see the quality of the breeder’s dogs before you contact them. Most people feel more comfortable contacting a breeder if they already know that the breeder has quality dogs.

10. Does the breeder want to maintain contact with you AFTER you get your puppy ?

Reputable breeders want to know how your puppy is doing, and should want to know if there are any problems. We INSIST on continued contact with our adoptive families, so that we can help with any issues that come up.

11. Do they breed more than one breed of dog ??

Top-quality, reputable breeders have only one breed, so that they can focus their breeding to improve their lines.  The more breeds they have, the more likely it’s a puppy mill.

12. Does the breeder ask lots of questions of you and have requirements that YOU must meet ?

A reputable breeder will want to make sure that the puppy they have is a good fit for your home. Just because you have the money to purchase a puppy does not mean that it is necessarily a good fit for your family.

These questions should help you determine if a breeder is right for you.  You may have other questions, but this should be a good start when interviewing prospective breeders. 
 
Have fun !!  ... and Good Luck !!

What about getting my puppy from a pet Store ??


          Click....


Pet Store Puppies

A "registry" is simply a for-profit company that will issue dogs a piece of paper in exchange for a fee... It's a way for backyard breeders to create fake pedigrees and dupe unsuspecting buyers...

The AKC and the United Kennel Club (UKC) are the only two legitimate registries of any significance in the United States... The UKC was originally established in the latter part of the 19th Century because the AKC didn't accept certain types of Bulldogs and other large-sized breeds, but the AKC is still the more prevalent and well-respected of the two organizations...

The AKC oversees the registries of the national breed clubs and dogs are exhibited in their respective categories... They also maintain genetic databases, breed wardens, kennel inspections, etc.
Your best bet is to ONLY deal with breeders that register with AKC, exhibit their dogs at shows, or belong to a breed-specific, or all-breed club... Even if you don't want a "show dog" - (and you most likely won't be getting a show dog anyway) - you're likelier to get a dog that has been properly health-screened, and whose parents have been genetically-tested. For Scottish Terriers, you should INSIST on seeing test results for vWD (von Willenbrand Disease) and CMO (Cranio Mandibular Osteopathy)...

Any person that gives you papers that are NOT from AKC should not be considered a reputable breeder..

The UABR(United All Breed Registry), the ACA (American Canine Association), APRI (American Pet Registry Inc.), CKC (Continental Kennel Club),or any number of other "registries" are simply not the same as AKC.



A health guarantee is just a piece of paper that simply says that a licensed veterinarian administered certain shots and performed wormings... Many backyard breeders are able to forge these documents... Insist on a sales contract, with specifics, including the health guarantee in writing.



Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Missouri, Kansas, (and several others) are known as very famous puppy-mill states.

You most likely have high expectations for the breeder of your Scottie. (If you don't, you SHOULD.) We also have high expectations for the families where our puppies go.



That is why we have an extensive interview process. You should expect to be asked several questions during our  phone interview with you.



We want to make sure that our puppies go ONLY to homes that are loving and caring. We do not put everyone who calls on our wait list. We turn people down if we don't think they are suitable for one of our pups.



To find out if you qualify, please call us !!

Reputable breeders care deeply about their dogs.  They invest lots of time, effort, and expense into developing healthy puppies.  Reputable breeders will have higher puppy prices than puppy mills because they CARE and spare no expense on their dogs!! 
 
Remember - You can pay a reputable breeder for a healthy puppy....  OR  you can pay your vet for a sick one.

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To order NuVet Plus, click HERE

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You don't have to have a Shady Nook Scottie to purchase 

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"I love all dogs, but I only sleep with Scotties...."
 
Shady Nook Scotties
Sindee Hart
Beautiful Southern Indiana
 
(812) 858-3977
Email me at:   shadynook47@gmail.com
This site, and all content herein, is copyrighted
by Shady Nook Scotties.
July, 2007.